The Flexible Mind: How Adapting To Change Enhances Your Life

“If you really want to escape the things that harass you, what you’re needing is not to be in a different place but to be a different person.” ― Seneca, Letters from a Stoic

When change hits, everyone starts to worry. Everyone, except those that look at change as a catapult to new personal growth. Your mindset plays an incredible role in the outcomes you experience in your life. As I’ve spoken about before, your beliefs and your ideas color the world around you. All that is needed to really experience a better life is a shift in mindset. One of the best ways to overcome a fear of change and reduce the anxiety attacks that usually follow, is to shift your mind now as we look into the ways that change can positively impact your life.

Accept future change as a unique gift. It is a lesson you can learn from as time moves on. Adapting to change is much more fruitful than avoiding and fighting it

Often times situations pop up in life once and only once. If you don’t accept the opportunity for growth you not only suffer while you resist, but you give up an opportunity to potentially add something great to your life’s resume. I’m not saying that all change is good for you, it may not be in your particular situation. So long as you are in no personal danger, though, taking the viewpoint that “this change could bring massive growth to my life” will absolutely open up more options for you. I’ve caught myself many times worried about the future because I was unsure of what was coming next. I knew change was there and I knew there was nothing I could do to prevent this, and then I asked myself “Why am I trying so hard to prevent this?” What if I used the energy I felt resisting the situation, and instead took that energy and focused it like a laser on accepting this change and growing with it. There’s power in that.

Take the time, mental energy and willpower you’ve spent avoiding something new and focus it instead on understanding and adapting to that new situation

Facing apparent change can be really scary, and it takes even more strength to acknowledge that you are afraid of what is coming. Once you have the self-awareness to admit you’re resisting what is to come, you’ve taken the first step to growth in this new situation. Focus your energy on finding new ways to make this situation better. Develop your willpower to the point where you can withstand the first days, weeks or months of this change, so that you can learn things that other people let escape them. Make a list of the potential positives for this situation. I’ve found the saying to be mostly true: “Where there’s a cloud there’s a silver lining”

If things don’t work out, realize that each experience is a chance to learn and grow

I’ve had many things in my life not go the way I had planned. After each experience, whether it took months or years to see it, there was always a lesson that I learned after it. Sometimes the lessons learned from hardship are the greatest lesson of them all, and I’m a firm believer in the idea that obstacles open up new doors for growth in our lives. If ultimately the change that you’re facing doesn’t work out- be willing to see the experience in it all. Often times I’ve had bad past experiences actually help me have greater success and make better decisions in completely unrelated situations. There’s psychology behind every situation and these lessons in the human mind are invaluable.

Take time to notice how others are reacting, and act differently

There’s a great quote by Mark Twain that goes along the lines of “When you find yourself on the side of the majority, take time to reflect.” I take this quote to heart. While it’s certainly fine to be on the side of the majority in certain situations (if your life is in danger, I highly suggest you don’t pause and think about it), but Mr. Twain has a great point. Our inherent tendency when stressed is to react in a negative manner. This limits our options and also causes us to feel like we can’t initially handle the situation in front of us. When you first notice this trigger, use it as a moment to pause and reflect on what your other options are. Seeing the reaction of others as you step back can almost make the situation humorous, which gives you time to think. I suggest this first and foremost because it is a great way to set a trigger. Learn from others and learn from your past experiences. This is the greatest way for you to grow.

Teach others the things you’ve learned, and help them through the change process

Once you become use to change and willing to accept it as a constant part of life, you can help others who haven’t accepted this part of life yet. I’m not really frightened of large changes anymore. My first instinct is to think of what positive aspects and new experiences this may lead to, and in doing so my initial reaction is much calmer than it used to be. In growing yourself this way, you can help others who are going along the process with you. Whether it’s at work or in your family life, help others see the brighter side of coming changes and the whole process will become easier for all of you. It’s always best to share what you learn, which is why I put Authentic Growth together for readers like you.

Books For Enhancing Your Mental Flexibility:

Mindset
Mindset
Psycho-Cybernetics
Psycho-Cybernetics
Anti-fragile
Anti-fragile
The Art of Exceptional Living
The Art of Exceptional Living

-Anthony from AuthenticGrowth.com

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